Poetry – Put down your most favorite verses

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This topic contains 68 replies, has 18 voices, and was last updated by  Sapphire 3 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #5449

    Aroth
    Participant

    Poetry is the language of the divine, of satyrs who sing to nymphs in the unquiet twilight, or of elves and witches that dance on the green in the light of the waxing moon – it is the language of love and madness, it is the medium of expression of the highest intellect and the silliest fool, for both seem to think that they can write poetry, though one of those classes is under a delusion.

    I could go on, but instead, I invite people to post their favorite verses, and to say what you like or don’t like about the verses posted here. Add a picture or two that you feel illustrates the verses, if you like. Come, step up and don’t be shy… show us the music that plays in the hidden gardens of your soul.

    As for me, ships and especially the sailing ships of old have always interested me, so let me put down the first verse of ‘Sea Fever’ by John Masefield. I don’t like the whole poem, just this one verse, but I think this one verse immortal. I’m often this way, sometimes ripping a few verses out of what the world calls an epic, and then calling just those few verses truly ‘epic’, truly immortal and truly, truly eternal.

    @amphitrite
    @anna-marine
    @kamal
    @speed-nukem
    @jupiter
    @kebin
    @tawfiq

    Welcome, all of you, and everyone else who this topic may interest!

    And now I step up and deliver my favorite lines about a sea-faring age that is now past and done.

    “I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky,
    And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by,
    And the wheel’s kick and the wind’s song and the white sail’s shaking,
    And a grey mist on the sea’s face, and a grey dawn breaking.”

    • This topic was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  Aroth.
    • This topic was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  Aroth.
    • This topic was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  indiapalette.
    • This topic was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  indiapalette.
    • This topic was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  indiapalette.
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    • This topic was modified 4 years, 7 months ago by  indiapalette.
    #5511

    @elysian-fields Well, there is indeed something called “sea-fever”. Sea is something which occupies the most of the area of the world and as we are inhabitants of this beautiful world, it has inevitable attraction to us.However, I want to interpret the following line in my own way,

    “And a grey mist on the sea’s face, and a grey dawn breaking.”

    To me this line has deeper meaning.When you move along the sea, you are in an uncertain territory.The living being which resides in land will always find the water kingdom mysterious.Now, for example, you are sailing for months and months and one day you reach a place which is a new discovery.Is it something you look for like Columbus did? Then this mist is being removed and the dawn is breaking, new sun shine is coming.It makes everything lucid.

    If I am given only these four lines, this will be the meaning of that poetry to me.

    #5530

    Aroth
    Participant

    @tawfiq

    That was a very wonderful interpretation – I especially enjoyed your description of finding a new world. It seems you are a very intelligent and imaginative person.

    #5541

    EllenSummers
    Participant

    Perhaps @jupiter @kebin @speed-nukem @eliteninja @tawfiq @kamal @dokuman @anna-marine might like this one…

    [center]…………….

    HOHENLINDEN

    by: Thomas Campbell (1777-1844)

    …………….[/center]

    On Linden when the sun was low,
    All bloodless lay the untrodden snow,
    And dark as winter was the flow
    Of Iser, rolling rapidly.

    But Linden saw another sight
    When the drum beat, at dead of night,
    Commanding fires of death to light
    The darkness of her scenery.

    By torch and trumpet fast arrayed
    Each horseman drew his battle blade,
    And furious every charger neighed,
    To join the dreadful revelry.

    Then shook the hills with thunder riven,
    Then rushed the steed to battle driven,
    And louder than the bolts of heaven
    Far flashed the red artillery.

    And redder yet those fires shall glow
    On Linden’s hills of blood-stained snow,
    And darker yet shall be the flow
    Of Iser, rolling rapidly.

    ‘Tis morn, but scarce yon lurid sun
    Can pierce the war-clouds, rolling dun,
    Where furious Frank and fiery Hun
    Shout in their sulphurous canopy.

    The combat deepens. On, ye brave,
    Who rush to glory, or the grave!
    Wave, Munich, all thy banners wave!
    And charge with all thy chivalry!

    Ah! few shall part where many meet!
    The snow shall be their winding-sheet,
    And every turf beneath their feet
    Shall be a soldier’s sepulchre.

    [center]…………….[/center]

    Image reference –
    Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier (1815-1891)

    Group of Cavalry in the Snow: Moreau and Dessoles before Hohenlinden, 1875

    Oil on canvas, 37.5 x 47 cm

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  EllenSummers.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  EllenSummers.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  EllenSummers.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  EllenSummers.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  EllenSummers.
    Attachments:
    #5570

    kamal
    Participant

    @elysian-fields

    Yes that poem absolutely convey my thoughts about sea life. “To the lonely sea and the sky, all i need is a ship to steer her by” vow fantastic. By the way why didn’t you like the entire poem. Is it for the reason that it conveys a hopeless life?

    @ellensummers

    I read it three to four times to understand it but at the end it is so picture clear and quite an alarming atmosphere. You’ve actually taken me to the battlefield lol.

    #5576

    EllenSummers
    Participant

    @kamal – glad that you liked it 🙂 I especially like the last two verses – they show the futility of war, where many of those who meet in ‘glorious’ battle never leave the battlefield. I think that’s the point of this poem, that the ‘glory’ of war, for many, only ends in death. That war is a futile thing.

    #5581

    Aroth
    Participant

    @kamal

    No, it’s not for the ideas behind the poem that I don’t like the rest of it, I just find the level of poetry – the quality of it, if you wish to think of it that way – much higher in this verse than in the rest of the poem. The rest of the poem, to my taste, is more mundane, more ordinary. That’s all.

    [quote=5570]Yes that poem absolutely convey my thoughts about sea life. “To the lonely sea and the sky, all i need is a ship to steer her by” vow fantastic. By the way why didn’t you like the entire poem. Is it for the reason that it conveys a hopeless life?[/quote]

    #5589

    @ellensummers Very nice poetry but as Kamal said, I also need to read it repeatedly to understand the deeper meaning.I also like the picture.It is very beautiful.

    #5596

    Satori
    Participant

    I LOVE WRITING LOVE,ROMANTIC POEMS! SO HERE IS ONE OF THEM WHICH I WOULD LIKE TO SHARE..

    I can feel in your kiss
    your soul with mine confused.
    And your eyes in my eyes
    reflection
    In light of that kiss on.
    The passion that dwells in my
    heart
    the beat will burn with it.
    So sweet my love,
    I love you.
    With immense madness, with my
    soul.
    Love Me now
    not tomorrow, not later.
    That certainly seems distant
    and too distant tomorrow.
    That power of love
    my body trembles,
    Love me today, not tomorrow, not
    later.

    #5597

    @madiha Liked that poetry very much.I like anything romantic.I write poetry too.

    #5598

    Aroth
    Participant

    @madiha

    Beautiful lines, very touching – I liked them very much! Anna-marine will show you how to create a blog tomorrow, if you like, and you can put up all your lovely poetry here.

    [quote=5596]I LOVE WRITING LOVE,ROMANTIC POEMS! SO HERE IS ONE OF THEM WHICH I WOULD LIKE TO SHARE..[/quote]

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  Aroth.
    #5600

    Aroth
    Participant

    I think this post should interest @tawfiq, @kamal @speed-nukem @amphitrite @anna-marine @jupiter @madiha @kebin @universalcitizen @ellensummers @eliteninja

    Anyway, here, for all who are interested, is an Indian, or to be more precise, a Bengali poem, by Shoshee Chunder Dutt.

    It is a vibrant paen to the warrior spirit. A realm sends its armies into battle against a tyrant, and they rejoice, believing in their victory. But instead, their armies are defeated, and their prince, leaving his legions to be slaughtered, flees to his citadel, only to find the gates shut against him by his wife with Spartan ethos. She refuses to recognize him, saying that her husband would rather have fallen on the field of battle than return defeated. And now, here is the poem…
    [hr]
    [center]The Warrior’s Return
    ………….[/center]

    Alas ! the vision mocks my sight ;
    I see no gallant throng,
    No trophies meet my longing eyes ;
    Bid cease the joyous song.

    That recreant slave is not my lord ;
    Ne’er thus the brave return ;
    Go, bid the city-gates be barr’d,
    And leave me alone to mourn.

    I know him not, I never knew
    A low, ignoble love ;
    My warrior sleeps upon the moor,
    His soul hath soar’d above.

    Upon the battle-field he lies,
    His garments stain’d with gore ;
    With sword in hand prepared he sleeps
    To fight the battle o’er.

    His shiver’d shield, his broken spear,
    Around him scatter’d lie ;
    The iron-breasted Moslems shook
    To see my hero die.

    Where helmets rang, where sabres smote,
    He found his gory bed ;
    Join, mourners, join, and loudly raise
    The requiem of the dead.

    Expel yon vile impostor hence ;
    I will not trust his tale ;
    Our warriors on the crimson field
    Their chieftain’s loss bewail.

    The mountain-torrent rushing down
    Can ne’er its course retrace,
    And souls that speed on glory’s path
    Must ever onward press :

    Aye, onward press to bleed and die,
    Triumphant still in death ;
    Impostor, hence! In other lands
    Go draw thy coward’s breath.

    [center]………….[/center]

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  Aroth.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  Aroth.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 4 months ago by  Aroth.
    Attachments:
    #5609

    kamal
    Participant

    A bit perplexed by the last verse of the poem.. What does it say? Impostor hence in other lands??

    #5610

    Satori
    Participant

    @elysian-fields @ tawfiq thanks for the comments..sure thing i will write on the blog!
    Soo many things to write on the blog…

    #5611

    kamal
    Participant

    INVICTUS

    By William Ernest Henley

    Out of the night that covers me,
    Black as the Pit from pole to pole,
    I thank whatever gods may be
    For my unconquerable soul.

    In the fell clutch of circumstance
    I have not winced nor cried aloud.
    Under the bludgeonings of chance
    My head is bloody, but unbowed.

    Beyond this place of wrath and tears
    Looms but the Horror of the shade,
    And yet the menace of the years
    Finds, and shall find, me unafraid.

    It matters not how strait the gate,
    How charged with punishments the scroll.
    I am the master of my fate:
    I am the captain of my soul.

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