Things I never used before moving to India

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  • #15200
    Antonina
    Participant

    [img]http://www.indiapalette.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Mosquito-killing-device.jpg[/img]

    You think it’s a tennis rocket? I thoughts so too when I saw men selling them in a subway, until they started making some very particular noise trying to convince me to buy the device. The noise these rockets were making reminded of a milder version of firecrackers. As it turned out, it’s a rechargeable mosquito killing rocket.

    We have lots of mosquitoes in Ukraine in summer and autumn, and they are a real pain – very irritating creatures. But in India they are also carriers of dangerous diseases like malaria and dengue fever, that’s why people take all the precautions to get rid of them. We use fumigators, special creams and yes, these deadly mosquito killing devices. Every evening I’m on a special mission of eradicating as many of them as possible. Sometimes it seems to me that it’s becoming my favorite sport 🙂

    And yes, I’ve never seen these rockets before moving to India. Or I’m just ignorant and they are widely used around the world?

    (To be continued 🙂 )

    • This topic was modified 5 years, 7 months ago by Antonina.
    #15206
    Paul
    Participant

    I’ve never seen them before either. How do they kill the mosquitoes, with electricity?

    #15210
    Antonina
    Participant

    Yes, they have a rechargeable battery inside. You press the button, hit the mosquitoes, and they get fried.

    #15213
    Nina
    Participant

    I need one!

    #15214
    Antonina
    Participant

    [quote=15213]I need one![/quote]

    I told you to get one, but you underestimated its practical use 🙂 Don’t worry, we’ll get a couple when you come next time.

    #15216
    Antonina
    Participant

    This is a brush for washing clothes. You simply soak your clothes in a bucket of water with washing powder, then put your garment on a tiled floor and scrub ti with this brush. This is how clothes are often washed in India. When I saw it for the first time, I swore that I would never do that, but alas 🙂 It takes a flexible mind to feel happy and comfortable in another culture.

    Yes, we have a washing machine, but it doesn’t always help. Firstly, there is a shortage of water in Mumbai. We get water supply only twice a day – early in the morning and once more in the evening. At this time we’re supposed to feel our tank on the roof of the building and then use that water up in the course of a day. Secondly, the electricity bills are rather high, so the less devices you use the better.

    Using domestic help, on the contrary, is rather common and affordable here. A wonderful woman Anju comes every morning to make chapatis for us and to do our laundry. When she can’t come, I do it or my mother in law.

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 7 months ago by indiapalette.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 7 months ago by indiapalette.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 7 months ago by indiapalette.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 7 months ago by indiapalette.
    #15305
    Kate
    Participant

    [quote=15200]rechargeable mosquito killing rocket[/quote]

    Interesting concept, I’ll make sure to try it out!

    #15375
    Alis
    Participant

    Yes, I experienced this way of washing clothes when traveling in India and it sucks, to be honest. Hope you’ll find a better option.

    #15424
    Kate
    Participant

    [quote=15375]I experienced this way of washing clothes when traveling in India and it sucks,[/quote]


    @alis
    , I’ve heard there are lots of laundries in the Indian cities. Did you use those?

    #15430
    Antonina
    Participant

    @kitkat, lots of travelers use laundry, or dry cleaning, services in the Indian cities. I use from time to time, when there is somethings particularly hard to wash.

    #15499
    Antonina
    Participant

    A pressure cooker is an irreplaceable device in every Indian household. 7 minutes – and your rice is ready! (Rice is eaten every day, sometimes twice – for example, rice with daal or curry for lunch and fried rice with vegetables for dinner).

    #16053
    Antonina
    Participant

    NO comments! Where else would you use a riksha except South Asia? 🙂

    Attachments:
    #16077
    barath
    Participant

    [quote=15206]I’ve never seen them before either. How do they kill the mosquitoes, with electricity? [/quote]
    I had like 5 bats in my home and they help in killing those mosquitoes, since All-out, or Goodnight makes some smell that we can’t bear.
    Each bat comes nearly a year, but replacing with a new batter still works for more years. The cost of each bat is somewhere around 100 to 150 rupees on the street shops.
    It is one of the important house hold item to have with everyone. Never touch the net as it gives shock due to the powerful capacitor that charged.

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 5 months ago by barath.
    #16125
    Antonina
    Participant

    [quote=16077]. Never touch the net as it gives shock due to the powerful capacitor that charged.[/quote]

    Good point 🙂

    #16205
    Antonina
    Participant

    A lime squeezer. I’ve never used it before, but here in India a glass of nimby pani (lime water) is such a relief on a hot day.

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